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Succulent Smoked Pork Tenderloin is tender, juicy, and brimming with irresistible smoky flavor, making it a welcome addition to any meal! This easy recipe works on any style of smoker and is appropriate for both beginners and more advanced cooks.

juicy smoked pork tenderloin on a platter

You’ll Love Making Perfect Smoked Pork Tenderloin

  • Oh-So-Flavorful. Pork tenderloin has a reputation for being a bland cut of meat, which means it’s all about what you add to it and how you cook it. This smoked pork tenderloin recipe uses a sweet-and-savory Pork Tenderloin Marinade to infuse the pork with flavor (the same one I use in my Grilled Pork Tenderloin), then adds even more flavor with the smoking process.
  • Health-Conscious Choice. Smoked pork tenderloin is a relatively low-carb, high-protein meal—in fact, pork tenderloin is an excellent lean protein source and it’s high in vitamin B too. It’s a standout in my Air Fryer Pork Tenderloin, Baked Pork Tenderloin, and Stuffed Pork Tenderloin.
  • A Great Smoking Recipe for Beginners. Like my Smoked Chicken Breast and Smoked Salmon, this smoked pork tenderloin is a wonderful recipe if you’ve just picked up a smoker and you’re still learning the ropes. Nothing complicated or fussy here.
  • Impress Your Dinner Guests (and Yourself). This smoked pork tenderloin recipe will wow your family and friends—and it’s sure to become a favorite in your household too. Pork tenderloin is a treat when it’s this tender, juicy, and full of smoky flavor!

How to Make Smoked Pork Tenderloin

The Ingredients

  • Pork Tenderloins. A lean cut of meat that’s tender, juicy, and ideal for smoking. (Don’t mistake it for pork loins! They’re two different cuts.)
  • Pork Tenderloin Marinade. While you can use your own marinade or spice rub, I recommend the one below, which tenderizes the meat and adds lots of sweet, savory, and tangy flavor.
  • Fuel. Charcoal, pellets, or whatever fuels your smoker. I use hardwood lump charcoal.
  • Wood Chips or Chunks. Apple is fantastic for smoked pork tenderloin.
  • Fresh Thyme. As an optional garnish.

Substitution Tip

I like finishing with fresh thyme, but if you want to lean into the sweet, tangy flavor of the marinade, you can serve smoked pork tenderloin with BBQ Sauce.

The Directions

  1. Prepare. Marinate the pork tenderloin or apply a spice rub. Preheat your smoker to 225 degrees F.
pork tenderloin smoking on the grill
  1. Smoke. When the pork tenderloins reach 135 degrees F, they’re done.
  2. Rest. Cover smoked pork tenderloins and rest for 10 minutes, then slice, serve, and ENJOY!

Storage Tips

  • To Store. Refrigerate smoked pork tenderloin in an airtight storage container for up to 3 days.
  • To Reheat. Warm up leftovers on a baking sheet in the oven at 350 degrees F, or in a skillet on the stovetop. The microwave works too, but it’s not ideal.
  • To Freeze. Freeze pork in an airtight container for up to 3 months. Thaw overnight in the refrigerator before reheating according to the instructions above.

Meal Prep Tip

Smoked pork tenderloin is a great meal prep option since it keeps for a few days in the refrigerator and works well in salads, sandwiches, and wraps.

Leftover Ideas

Add slices of smoked pork tenderloin to Air Fryer Grilled Cheese with sliced apples and caramelized onions.

What to Serve with Smoked Pork Tenderloin

Recipe Tips and Tricks

  • Watch the Temperature, Not the Time. The times listed in the recipe card below are a rough estimate and vary depending on your smoker setup and the thickness of the meat. The best way to know when your smoked pork tenderloin is done is to monitor the temperature with an instant-read thermometer. When the internal temperature reaches 135 degrees F at the thickest point, you can remove the pork from the smoker and let it rest until it reaches 145 degrees F, which is the temperature at which the FDA says pork is safe to eat.
  • Check at the 30-Minute Mark. So how do you know when to start checking the temperature of the pork with your meat thermometer? I usually start checking for progress at the 30-minute mark.
  • Don’t Skip the Rest. The rest isn’t just the time needed for the temperature to rise! It also allows the moisture to reincorporate back into the meat, instead of seeping out if you cut into it too soon. Cover the smoked pork tenderloin with aluminum foil and let it rest for 10 minutes.
  • Marinate for Maximum Tenderness. A dry pork rub is fabulous too, but if you want seriously tender and juicy smoked pork tenderloins, marinate them first. The apple cider vinegar in the marinade does a great job tenderizing the meat.
  • Use High-Quality Wood and Charcoal. I recommend hardwood lump charcoal (such as FOGO) and apple or another mild fruit wood.

How to Smoke Pork Tenderloin

4.50 from 6 votes
A step-by-step recipe for how to smoke pork tenderloin that's juicy and tender. A delicious marinade makes it the best!

Prep: 10 minutes
Cook: 1 hour
Total: 2 hours

Servings: 6 servings

Ingredients
  

  • 2, 1- to 2- pound pork tenderloins
  • Pork Tenderloin Marinade listed below, or your spice rub of choice
  • Charcoal pellets, or whatever fuels your smoker, we use hardwood lump charcoal
  • Wood chips or chunks such as apple
  • Chopped fresh thyme optional for serving

Pork Tenderloin Marinade


Instructions
 

  • If using the marinade, stir all of the ingredients (garlic, vinegar, oil, mustard, maple syrup, salt, and pepper) together in small bowl or a measuring cup with a spout.
  • Pat the pork dry and trim away the silver skin from the pork. If marinading, place the pork in the ziptop bag, seal, and marinade the pork in the refrigerator for at least 2 hours or up to 1 day. If not marinading, apply your favorite spice rub. Let the pork stand at room temperature for 30 minutes prior to smoking.
  • Heat your smoker to 225°F. Prior to lighting, add the wood, mixing it with the charcoal. It’s OK if your smoker gets a bit hotter than 225°F; just note that the pork will cook faster.
  • Add the tenderloins and smoke until they reach 135°F on an instant-read thermometer inserted at the thickest part, about 45 minutes to 1 hour for a 1 1/2-pound pork tenderloin; the cooking time will vary based on your smoker setup and temperature, and how much your smoker temperature is fluctuating. Check the pork at the 30-minute mark to gauge its progress.
  • Once the pork reaches 135°F, remove it to a platter, cover and let rest for 10 minutes (its temperature will rise as it rests). Sprinkle with chopped fresh thyme, then slice into 1-inch medallions. Enjoy warm or at room temperature.

Notes

  • Nutritional information is an estimate based on 3 pounds of meat; it does not include the marinade, as it is optional and may be substituted with a dry rub.
  • TO STORE: Refrigerate smoked pork tenderloin in an airtight storage container for up to 3 days.
  • TO REHEAT: Warm up leftovers on a baking sheet in the oven at 350°F, or in a skillet on the stovetop. The microwave works too, but it’s not ideal.
  • TO FREEZE: Freeze pork in an airtight container for up to 3 months. Thaw overnight in the refrigerator before reheating according to the instructions above.

Nutrition

Serving: 1(of 6)Calories: 91kcalProtein: 16gFat: 3gSaturated Fat: 1gPolyunsaturated Fat: 0.4gMonounsaturated Fat: 1gTrans Fat: 0.03gCholesterol: 49mgPotassium: 297mgVitamin A: 2IUCalcium: 5mgIron: 1mg

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Erin Clarke

Hi, I'm Erin Clarke, and I'm fearlessly dedicated to making healthy food that's affordable, easy-to-make, and best of all DELISH. I'm the author and recipe developer here at wellplated.com and of The Well Plated Cookbook. I adore both sweets and veggies, and I am on a mission to save you time and dishes. WELCOME!

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7 Comments

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  1. The flavor was excellent when the pork was finally done, but after an hour on the Traeger (and reaching 135) and tented for 10 minutes as directed, our pork was not at all done. We put it back on for another hour, and it still wasn’t done! We had two tenderloins weighing 1.25 each. I checked an actual Traeger recipe, and it says wait until 145 is reached. Any thoughts?3 stars

    1. Hi Lani! I’m sorry to hear you had trouble with the recipe did you see this under out tips and tricks: “Watch the Temperature, Not the Time. The times listed in the recipe card below are a rough estimate and vary depending on your smoker setup and the thickness of the meat. The best way to know when your smoked pork tenderloin is done is to monitor the temperature with an instant-read thermometer. When the internal temperature reaches 135 degrees F at the thickest point, you can remove the pork from the smoker and let it rest until it reaches 145 degrees F, which is the temperature at which the FDA says pork is safe to eat.” Hope this helps!

      1. We did use the Traeger thermometer and watched it intently. When it reached 135, we removed and tented it as advised. The pork was completely raw inside.5 stars

  2. This was really good! We did two and did not have problems with undercooking. One we removed at 135 (the other one was already 140, oops). The pork was perfect!5 stars